Scleroderma Drug In Development PDF Print E-mail
Friday, 16 October 2009 10:57
According to The Commercial Appeal, arGentis Pharmaceutical has partnered with Shattuck Hammond Partners, the health care investment arm of Morgan Keegan and Co. Inc., to jump-start a capital campaign to raise $12 million to $15 million. ArGentis shelved the campaign last year when the economy soured.

The money will help continue a three-year effort by arGentis to shepherd a treatment for Scleroderma, an autoimmune disease that affects blood vessels and connective tissue. Ted Townsend, the company's vice president of business development, said the treatment could be on the market as early as 2013.

The company has just finished reviewing the treatment's previous clinical trial. The next trial will be the drug's last before it heads to the Food and Drug Administration for market approval. To help that process along, arGentis has assembled a "dream team" to serve on its scientific advisory board.

For example, new board member Maureen D. Mayes wrote "The Scleroderma Book" in 1999. University of California Los Angeles professor Daniel Furst, Georgetown School of Medicine professor Virginia D. Steen and UCLA biostatistics professor Weng Kee Wong also joined the arGentis scientific advisory board.

"These physicians understand this disease process better than anyone in the world," said Townsend. "Their participation in the trial shows the validity of our therapy and will hopefully reinforce our credibility to regulatory authorities."

However, Charles Spaulding, vice president of communications with the Scleroderma Research Foundation, said the disease largely flies under national research radar.

"There's not enough researchers looking at the disease and not enough money being spent on Scleroderma research," Spaulding said.

ArGentis' Scleroderma treatment received "orphan status" in the United States and in the European Union. The designation gives the company market exclusivity for seven years here and 10 years in Europe.

Townsend said the treatment could be a $1 billion annual opportunity in the U.S. and Europe.

The company also has license agreements in hand for about 50 markets globally.

To view the full article, click here.
 
More articles :

» Two Problems That People With Scleroderma Face: Malabsorption and Inflammation

According to , many doctors agree that starts with inflammation, and its progress depends on how much inflammation continues to occur in the body. That's one reason some doctors recommend that patients with any sort of inflammatory disease such as...

» Scleroderma Patients At Greater Risk Of Myocardial Infarction Within First Year

According to the first large population-based cohort study of its kind, patients with Systemic Sclerosis or were found to be at a greater than eightfold increased risk of having an acute (MI) during their first year after diagnosis. After that...

» Why is Esophageal Manometry Done?

Esophageal manometry is used to evaluate the function of the muscles of your esophagus - the tube that connects your throat to your stomach. Circular bands of muscle (sphincters) at the top and bottom of your esophagus open and close to let food...

» Scleroderma and Massage Therapy

In a recent patient group meeting, we had the immense pleasure and honour of sitting with Rinalda, a local massage therapist, to discuss the importance of massage therapy and how it can help with our Scleroderma.Rinalda noted that from the beginning...

» Scleroderma Herbal Treatments

is a connective tissue disease. It causes the skin and internal organs to become hard and tight. This hardening can make it difficult for the sufferer to walk or move and can cause organs to fail. According to the Scleroderma Foundation, in the...

» What's Your Scleroderma Action Plan?

Living with any serious disease or condition like Scleroderma, is without a doubt, difficult. It is not hard to understand either, that we often can lose sight of what is important, including our way. We may also fall into to a false sense of...