Rheumatologist Receives Scleroderma Foundation's Lifetime Achievement Award PDF Print E-mail
Thursday, 17 September 2009 10:52
In a recent Medical News Today article, it was reported that Thomas A. Medsger Jr., M.D.,  Gerald P. Rodnan Professor of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, received the Scleroderma Foundation's Lifetime Achievement Award in recognition of his service to the Scleroderma community. The award is the foundation's highest honor and is presented to individuals who have devoted a minimum of 20 years of service, either as a volunteer or professional, to the Scleroderma community.

Dr. Medsger has served as chief of the University of Pittsburgh's Division of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, and director of the Scleroderma Research Program and UPMC's Scleroderma Clinic. His primary clinical and investigative interest is in Scleroderma and other connective tissue diseases.

In 2001 and 2005, Dr. Medsger was the recipient of the Scleroderma Foundation's Doctor of the Year award. He also has been designated as one of the Best Doctors in America by American Health Magazine for the past two decades and was the recipient of the American College of Rheumatology's Distinguished Rheumatologist Award. Recently, he had the title of "Master" conferred upon him by the American College of Rheumatology - a title awarded to members of high professional competence, ethics and moral standing who have significantly furthered the science of rheumatology.

Dr. Medsger currently serves as the Scleroderma Foundation Western Pennsylvania Chapter's treasurer and interim president. He has written numerous articles for the Foundation's Voice magazine and has published more than 300 journal articles about scleroderma and related diseases.

Read the full article here.
 
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