Women At Higher Risk For Autoimmune Diseases PDF Print E-mail
Wednesday, 09 September 2009 11:11
In a recent article on PrivateMD, it was reiterated that women are at a significantly higher risk of contracting an autoimmune disease than men, according to an expert in the field.

Dr Vivian Pinn, director of the National Institutes of Health Office of Research on Women's Health recently interviewed Dr Robert Carter to discuss diagnoses and developments in the treatment of autoimmune diseases, as they apply to women. Carter is the deputy director of the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases.

According to the researchers, autoimmune diseases result in an immune system which improperly begins to attack healthy cells in the body. These types of diseases, many of which can be diagnosed by blood tests, are able to upset nearly every organ system and often last an entire lifetime.

"Looking at sex and gender differences has provided researchers with many clues," Carter commented. "The presence of female hormones as well as the fact that women have two X chromosomes may play a part in contributing to the development of an autoimmune disease."

Autoimmune diseases more common in women include lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, scleroderma and thyroid disease.

Dr James Norman of endochrineweb.com reports that administering at least two thyroid tests "can usually detect even the slightest abnormality of thyroid function." He warns that those with a history of thyroid disease in their families should be particularly responsive to associated symptoms.

Read more here.
 
More articles :

» Juvenile Localized Scleroderma: Fewer Flares With Methotrexate

was an effective and well-tolerated treatment for in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial involving 70 patients with active disease. At the end of the 12-month study, 31 of 46 patients randomized to receive methotrexate had...

» Predictors Of Interstitial Lung Disease In Early Systemic Sclerosis

Introduction: The objective of the present study was to examine the association of baseline demographic andclinical characteristics with sequentially obtained measurements of forced vital capacity (FVC), expressed as apercentage of the predicted...

» Morphea Scleroderma

Morphea, is one of two types of localized , and a disorder characterized by excessive deposits leading to thickening of the dermis, subcutaneous tissues, or both. The cause of Scleroderma is unknown. It is important to remember that it is not...

» Important Information About Autoimmune Diseases

There are more than 100 known autoimmune disorders, including rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes, scleroderma, and lupus. Normally, your immune system is designed to protect your health. But in some people, the immune system creates...

» Making A Difference

, a Center for Student Missions team member, recently recounted a touching experience, in which she heard about and met someone with Scleroderma for the very first time. According to Jessica, "We don't always get to see the effect of what it is we...

» HSCT Benefits In Early Diffuse Cutaneous Systemic Sclerosis

Initial results from an international, investigator-initiated, open label phase 3 trial, presented at EULAR 2012, indicate that haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) results in better long-term survival than conventional treatment for...