Clinical Significance of Antibodies to Ro52/TRIM21 in Systemic Sclerosis PDF Print E-mail
Thursday, 08 March 2012 09:27
Marie Hudson, Janet Pope, Michael Mahler, Solene Tatibouet, Russell Steele, Murray Baron, Canadian Scleroderma Research Group (csrg) and Marvin J Fritzler
Arthritis Research & Therapy 2012, 14:R50 doi:10.1186/ar3763
Published: 6 March 2012

Introduction
Autoantibodies to Ro52 recently identified as TRIM21 are among the most common autoantibodies in systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases, but their clinical association remains poorly understood. We undertook this study to determine clinical and serological associations of anti-Ro52/TRIM21 antibodies in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc).

Methods
Detailed clinical data and sera from 963 patients with SSc enrolled in a multi-centre cohort study were collected and entered into a central database. Antibodies to Ro52/TRIM21 and other autoantibodies were detected by an addressable laser bead immunoassay and different enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) systems. Associations between anti-Ro52/TRIM21 antibodies and clinical and other serological manifestations of SSc were investigated.

Results
Anti-Ro52/TRIM21 antibodies were present in 20% of SSc patients and overlapped with other main SSc-related antibodies, including anti-centromere (by immunofluorescence and centromere protein (CENP)-A and CENP-B ELISA), anti-topoisomerase I, anti-RNA polymerase III and anti-Pm/Scl antibodies. Anti-Ro52/TRIM21 antibodies were strongly associated with interstitial lung disease (odds ratio (OR) 1.53, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.11, 2.12, p=0.0091) and overlap syndrome (OR 2.06, 95% CI 1.01, 4.19, p=0.0059).

Conclusions
Anti-Ro52/TRIM21 antibodies were the second most common autoantibody in this SSc cohort. In SSc, anti-Ro52/TRIM21 antibodies may be a marker of interstitial lung disease and overlap syndrome.

The complete article is available below as a provisional PDF.

 
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