Clinical Significance of Antibodies to Ro52/TRIM21 in Systemic Sclerosis PDF Print E-mail
Thursday, 08 March 2012 09:27
Marie Hudson, Janet Pope, Michael Mahler, Solene Tatibouet, Russell Steele, Murray Baron, Canadian Scleroderma Research Group (csrg) and Marvin J Fritzler
Arthritis Research & Therapy 2012, 14:R50 doi:10.1186/ar3763
Published: 6 March 2012

Introduction
Autoantibodies to Ro52 recently identified as TRIM21 are among the most common autoantibodies in systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases, but their clinical association remains poorly understood. We undertook this study to determine clinical and serological associations of anti-Ro52/TRIM21 antibodies in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc).

Methods
Detailed clinical data and sera from 963 patients with SSc enrolled in a multi-centre cohort study were collected and entered into a central database. Antibodies to Ro52/TRIM21 and other autoantibodies were detected by an addressable laser bead immunoassay and different enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) systems. Associations between anti-Ro52/TRIM21 antibodies and clinical and other serological manifestations of SSc were investigated.

Results
Anti-Ro52/TRIM21 antibodies were present in 20% of SSc patients and overlapped with other main SSc-related antibodies, including anti-centromere (by immunofluorescence and centromere protein (CENP)-A and CENP-B ELISA), anti-topoisomerase I, anti-RNA polymerase III and anti-Pm/Scl antibodies. Anti-Ro52/TRIM21 antibodies were strongly associated with interstitial lung disease (odds ratio (OR) 1.53, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.11, 2.12, p=0.0091) and overlap syndrome (OR 2.06, 95% CI 1.01, 4.19, p=0.0059).

Conclusions
Anti-Ro52/TRIM21 antibodies were the second most common autoantibody in this SSc cohort. In SSc, anti-Ro52/TRIM21 antibodies may be a marker of interstitial lung disease and overlap syndrome.

The complete article is available below as a provisional PDF.

 
More articles :

» Scientists Identify New Genetic Region Associated with Scleroderma

New research supported, in part, by the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) has identified a new genetic link to systemic sclerosis (also known as systemic scleroderma) and confirmed three previously...

» Development of a Five-Year Mortality Model in Systemic Sclerosis Patients

L. Beretta, A. Santaniello, F. Cappiello, N.V. Chawla, M.C. Vonk, P.E. Carreira, Y. Allanore, D.A. Popa-Diaconu, M. Cossu, F. Bertolotti, G. Ferraccioli, A. Mazzone, R. ScorzaReceived on November 17, 2009; accepted in revised form on October 5,...

» Simple Predictor In Scleroderma Related Interstitial Lung Disease

Patients at high risk of deterioration or death from Systemic Sclerosis-related interstitial lung disease can be readily spotted using CT scans, suggest Melbourne researchers.Patients classified as having “extensive” (> 20%) lung disease as...

» Caution Needed When Using ACE Inhibitors in Scleroderma

Exposure to angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors prior to the onset of renal crisis in patients with increases the risk of death, according to 1-year findings from the prospective observational International Scleroderma Renal Crisis Survey.The...

» Anticentromere Antibody Positive Sjögren’s Syndrome: A Retrospective Descriptive Analysis

Introduction: A subgroup of patients with primary Sjögren’s Syndrome (SS) and positive anticentromere antibodies (ACA) were recognized as having features intermediate between SS and systemic sclerosis (SSc). Our goal was to describe this group...

» Endothelin Receptor Antagonists for the Treatment of Raynaud’s Phenomenon and Digital Ulcers in Systemic Sclerosis

Kait Arefiev, David F. Fiorentino, and Lorinda ChungDivision of Immunology and Rheumatology, Departments of Dermatology and Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto VA Health Care System, 3801 Miranda Avenue, Palo Alto, CA 94304,...