Shyanne Adams Heading To London Courtesy Of The Make-A-Wish Foundation PDF Print E-mail
Friday, 09 December 2011 17:31
It wasn't until Shyanne Adams started feeling better recently that she realized just how hard the past year has been. “I think I was in shock the whole year,” said the 14-year-old Eagle Valley Middle School eighth-grader. “I was depressed. I slept a lot.”

She first noticed something was wrong when her fingers started turning blue, almost black, and her hands and feet started to swell. Doctors in Reno referred her to specialists at the Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford who diagnosed her with Scleroderma.

Shyanne underwent chemotherapy to stop the disease from moving to her oesophagus and kidneys, making monthly trips to Stanford for treatment. It was hard for her sister Shania, older by just 10 months, to watch.

“(Shyanne) was weak all the time,” Shania remembered. “I wondered, how could it be her? She's the younger sister.” Their mother, Shona, struggled with her daughter's illness as well. “It was hard on me,” she said. “It was scary and hard to deal with.”

Although Shyanne will live with the disease the rest of her life - needing to carefully monitor her heart, kidney, stomach and other organs as well as her joints for rheumatoid arthritis - she is now in remission. Just as the family suffered together during the past year, they also will celebrate Shyanne's recovery as a family.

The Make-A-Wish Foun­da­tion, which grants the wishes of children with life-threatening diseases, is giving the family a Christmas trip to London. “I'm so excited,” said Shy­anne, who will be flying in a plane for the first time when she begins the trip Sunday with her mom, sister and dad, John.

They have planned to visit the tomb of King Henry III, Big Ben, Harry Potter attractions and maybe a side trip to Paris.

Shania is also interested in checking out the historic sites. “I love the whole Victorian ages,” she said. The family will officially be presented the trip during the third annual National Believe Day at Macy's in the Meadowood Mall in Reno.

Shona said the vacation is well-deserved after Shy­anne's perseverance through treatment. “Even with all the needles and all the poking, she made the honor roll,” Shona said. “She was a trouper through all of it.” And while she's grateful for the opportunity, she also is a little overwhelmed.

Source: NevadaAppeal

 
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