Tips For Healthier Living PDF Print E-mail
Monday, 31 October 2011 11:36
taken from http://www.flickr.com/photos/disaster_area/4073027964/ via creative commonsAt the Scleroderma Care Foundation, we believe that maintaining a healthy and active lifestyle is integral to our individual ability to manage Scleroderma. This can include regular exercise, refraining from or quitting smoking, ensuring that we stay warm, getting enough rest, and most importantly, developing and sustaining a healthy mental and emotional state.

Healthy living doesn’t have to be hard, but it does require a small amount of commitment and desire achieve positive long-term results for ourselves. So, here are a couple tips or suggestions on how you can achieve just that;

1. Enjoy a pint of water first thing in the morning.
If you haven’t got time for anything else in the morning, make time to drink a big glass of water. We lose a lot of oxygen through the night and to rejuvenate our cells, we need to supply them with water and oxygen. Drink a glass of water and within a week you’ll begin to feel less tired. Some people don't like the taste of water, so squeeze some fresh lime into your water to give it taste and drink up.

2. Grab a few fresh fruits on your way out.
Wherever you’re going – whether it’s a walk or drive to the supermarket or on your way to a meeting – pick up one or two fruits and eat them. If you leave for work in the morning and don’t return ’til evening, take a few fruits and eat them throughout the day. Fruits are great for their nutrients, vitamins and sugars that are required in our body.

3. Avoid going to junk food shops with your work mates.
If your work mates are going and you want to go along, go ahead but don’t order the burger or french fries. Go for a nice salad instead. Or any other healthy meal that takes your fancy. Junk food is full of “empty calories” that do nothing for your body but put on extra unneeded and unhealthy fat.

4. Exercise on the go.
If you work in an office, get up every 30 minutes and go for a walk. If you have an office with stairs and can make it, move up and down the stairs every couple of hours. Get your blood flowing and your muscles moving.

5. Drink herbal teas.
When at work or home, many people love to get a cup of tea or coffee. Decide that you’ll be more healthy and get a warm cup of herbal tea instead. The selection available today is absolutely massive, so you’re guaranteed to find one you enjoy. You might like to try mandarin and ginseng tea, as well as fennel seed tea.

6. Eat a handful of nuts.
Get your favorite selection of nuts (almonds, cashews, pecans, walnuts, etc.) and raisins and have a big handful of them at around 3pm. This has been shown to increase afternoon energy and productivity.

7. Say yes to freshly squeezed juice.
One of the biggest and most exciting changes we have made was saying “yes” to having freshly squeezed juice every morning. You would notice increased levels of energy and vitality. If you don’t have the time to juice, ask someone if they can make it for you in exchange for something you can help them with, or get yourself to a local juice bar and get your share of the juice!

8. Deep breathing.
When you’ve got time – at your desk, driving the car, cooking – do some deep breathing. Inhale and count up to 5 seconds, hold it for a few seconds, and release slowly. Exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide is one of the best things we can do for our blood and cells.

These are just a few tips of course. If you're doing anything else, and realizing significant results, do tell...

Source: Lifehack

 
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