Dealing With Joint Pain PDF Print E-mail
Friday, 12 August 2011 11:15
In a recent Q&A, Dr. Peter Got noted that the common causes of joint pain include autoimmune disorders, lupus, Paget's disease of the bone, hemochromatosis, hypothyroidism (that can lead to muscle aches, tenderness and stiffness in the shoulders and hips), gout, bursitis, bone cancer, osteomalacia, psoriatic arthritis, scleroderma, or another of the more than 100 different forms of the arthritis, as well as tick-borne disorders, including Lyme disease, mixed connective tissue disease, infection and injury.

Fibromyalgia involves widespread pain of muscles and ligaments that also might be considered. This disorder cannot be confirmed by X-ray or other testing and is almost a diagnosis of exclusion.

He recommended that pain sufferers make an appointment with a rheumatologist or other super-specialist at a nearby teaching hospital who has a good reputation for dealing with joint pain. While you really need to find out what is going on, there are some forms of pain management in the interim that can help relieve pain and stress.

They include chiropractic, water aerobics, massage, acupuncture, yoga and tai-chi. Consider topical creams with soothing capsaicin such as Castiva and over-the-counter ibuprofen, naproxen sodium or aspirin.

Be sure to eat well, get adequate sleep, and exercise as much as possible without further aggravating your condition. Muscle pain prevents people from functioning normally on a daily basis.

 
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