Adult Stem Cells Are Helping Scleroderma Patients PDF Print E-mail
Wednesday, 20 July 2011 22:37
Dr. Richard Burt and colleagues at Northwestern University have just published a new study in The Lancet that provides more evidence for the success of adult stem cell transplant in treating System Sclerosis (Scleroderma).

Ten patients were treated with their own adult stem cells, and all improved at or before 12 months after treatment, compared with zero of the nine patients that received cyclophosphamide, a chemotherapeutic agent considered the “standard of care” for this disease. None of the adult stem cell-treated patients had their disease worsen, while 8 of the 9 chemo-treated patients showed worsening, and eventually 7 of the chemo patients switched to the adult stem cell treatment.

The researchers note that the adult stem cell treatment improves skin and lung function in these patients for up to 2 years (the length of the current study) and is preferable to the current standard of care.

The new report is accompanied by a commentary by Farge and Gluckman that says the Burt et al. study provides “the best data to date for transplantation in Scleroderma”, and “Despite the small number of patients and short follow-up of ASSIST, the findings of this trial are important for patients with systemic sclerosis, the medical community, and policy makers.”

Dr. Burt is featured in a recently-released video discussing his ideas for use of adult stem cells to treat patients with autoimmune diseases. Burt and his team are using this technique to help treat patients suffering from some 23 different diseases, and the techniques he has developed are now being used in treatment centers around the globe.

Adult stem cells are helping patients now.

Source: Prentice, D. (2011), "Adult Stem Cells Helping Patients With Scleroderma Skin Disease"; Lifenews.com; original article can be viewed here.

 
More articles :

» Beta-thymosins and Interstitial Lung Disease: Study of a Scleroderma Cohort with a One-year Follow-up

Beta-thymosins play roles in cytoskeleton rearrangement, angiogenesis, fibrosis and reparative process, thus suggesting a possible involvement in the pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis. The aim of the study was to investigate the presence of...

» New Study Shows Increased Risk Of Cancer In Scleroderma

patients have a 75% increased risk of cancer compared to the general population, a meta-analysis confirms, leading the authors to recommend screening in these patients.Patients were at particular risk of developing (RR 4.35) and haematological...

» Scleroderma Foundation's 13th Annual National Patient Education Conference Is Here

Nearly 600 people are anticipated to visit the heart of San Francisco Friday, July 8, through Sunday, July 10, for the Scleroderma Foundation's 13th Annual National Patient Education Conference. Patients, family members, caregivers, doctors and...

» A Brief History of Scleroderma

While scleroderma may not be very well known to the average person, investigation reveals it has been around for a long time.Classical ReferencesCases of skin disease similar to scleroderma may be found in the writings of Hippocrates as far back as...

» Georgetown Study: Scleroderma Dramatically Under-diagnosed With Commercial Screening Method

New research from Georgetown University Medical Center (GUMC) suggests that up to 40 percent of patients will not be correctly diagnosed with the disorder using a new automated commercial screening test. The findings of the study will be presented...

» Digital Ulcers Linked to More Severe Systemic Sclerosis

Digital ulcers are associated with more severe systemic sclerosis (SSc) disease, including skin and lung involvement, but not with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) or scleroderma renal crisis (SRC), according to research published in the...