Liver Autoantibodies in Patients with Scleroderma PDF Print E-mail
Tuesday, 19 October 2010 20:53
Thelma L. Skare & Renato M. Nisihara & Osvaldo Haider & Pedro M. Azevedo & Shirley R. R. Utiyama
Received: 5 January 2010 / Revised: 13 August 2010 / Accepted: 26 September 2010
# Clinical Rheumatology 2010

Association between autoimmune liver diseases and scleroderma has been described. The purpose of this study was to study the prevalence of antimithocondrial antibody (AMA), antismooth muscle antibodies (SMA), and liverkidney-microsomal (LKM-1) autoantibody in a cohort of 63 scleroderma patients and 100 healthy controls. The autoantibodies AMA, SMA, and LKM were determined by indirect immunofluorescence. Patients' charts were reviewed for demographic data, scleroderma form, and clinical and antinuclear antibody profile, aiming a comparison between patients with and without liver autoantibodies. Nine patients (14.3%) were positive for at least one of the liver autoantibodies; only one patient had both AMA and SMA positive.

Antibody SMA was positive in 6.4% (4/63) patients; AMA was present in 9.52% (6/63) of them; none were positive to LKM-1. In the control group just one patient (1%) was SMA positive; the other autoantibodies were negative. There is an increased prevalence of liver autoantibodies in patients with scleroderma than in control population. These patients should be carefully followed for liver dysfunction.

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