Mouth Exercises For Scleroderma PDF Print E-mail
Saturday, 07 August 2010 00:59
taken from http://www.flickr.com/photos/lindawild/2417728275/sizes/m/in/photostream/ via creative commons The loss of facial mobility may restrict the ability to chew foods and perform adequate moth hygiene. Below is some advice on maintaining facial mobility through exercise.

INSTRUCTIONS:
Do exercises in front of a mirror.

Massage (firm touch) the entire face using small circular motions with the finger tips, a warm facecloth or vibrator, then massage each specific area again just before exercising that part.

The number of repetitions necessary to get maximal mobility depends upon the individual. One approach is to do the exercise fast for two or three times as a warm up and then do five repetitions holding each stretch position to the count of five. Sustained stretch is more effective for increasing mobility than rapid motions.

EXERCISES:
  • Raise the eyebrows as high as possible. Return to the normal position.
  • Bring the eyebrows down and together as hard as possible as if frowning. Then raise eyebrows as high as possible.
  • Wrinkle the bridge of the nose by raising the upper lip and then frowning (as if smelling something bad).
  • Close the eyes very tight. Then release the squeeze slowly and raise the eyebrows as high as possible before opening the eyes.
  • Flare the nostrils, then narrow the nostrils down, pushing the upper lip out.
  • Make an exaggerated tight wink with each eye separately, using the cheek muscles to help close the eye.
  • Cover the teeth with the lips. Then open the mouth as wide as possible without the teeth showing. Close lips and press hard (as if blotting lipstick).
  • Open the mouth so that the lips are as wide apart as possible.
  • Open the mouth so that the teeth are as far apart as possible.
  • Push the jaw forward to create an underbite (bottom teeth in front of the upper teeth).
  • Make as wide a grin as possible without showing the teeth.
  • Keep exercising the jaw by opening and closing the mouth!

Source: HAPS (Hunter Area Pathology Service)
 
More articles :

» Managing Your Digical Ulcer

Around 40% of patients with develop open sores on their fingertips called digital ulcers. In some patients, this is the major ongoing difficulty whereas in others, digital ulcers are an uncommon and short term complication.Digital ulcers occur...

» Kidney Involvement In Scleroderma

Kidney disease is one of the manifestations of vascular, or blood vessel involvement, in .Other manifestations of vascular disease in Scleroderma include Raynaud's phenomenon, telangiectasia (dilated blood vessels, most common on the face and...

» Juvenile Localized Scleroderma: Fewer Flares With Methotrexate

was an effective and well-tolerated treatment for in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial involving 70 patients with active disease. At the end of the 12-month study, 31 of 46 patients randomized to receive methotrexate had...

» Autoimmune Disease Symptoms To Look Out For

We have understood for  a long time that the detection and subsequent diagnoses of autoimmune diseases are difficult. However, there are key rheumatic and physical indicators such as joint pain and fatigue, fevers, increasing skin conditions,...

» Caribbean Autoimmune Disease Summit 2011

The Caribbean Autoimmune Disease Summit 2011, is scheduled to be held this Sunday 2nd October, 2011 at the , Port of Spain, Trinidad. Hosted by the Caribbean Investor Network, the Summit aims to raise awareness of Autoimmune Diseases, their...

» The Scleroderma Foundation Teams Up with Traitwise

The has teamed up with Austin, TX company, Incorporated, to launch a unique survey to poll thousands of patients and their caregivers. Data from the survey will be shared with researchers nationally and internationally in an effort to improve...