Real-World Bosentan Therapy Successful in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension: Presented at ATS PDF Print E-mail
Wednesday, 19 May 2010 19:52
Real-life experiences in treating patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension with bosentan appears to provide similar efficacy as seen in clinical trials -- despite patients being somewhat older and having more scleroderma, researchers said today here at the American Thoracic Society (ATS) 2010 International Conference.

"We also found that in our population of patients abnormal liver function tests were observed more often than in clinical trials," said Nathan Dwyer, MD, Pulmonary Medicine, Foothills Medical Center, Calgary, Alberta. He conducted his work at Royal Hobart Hospital, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia.

"Overall, we found that bosentan and other endothelin-receptor antagonists used to treat pulmonary arterial hypertension are effective in treating patients who may fall outside the tight criteria for patients in clinical trials," Dr. Dwyer said during his poster presentation.

He said that of the 152 patients treated in Tasmania, 23 patients developed abnormal liver function tests that required 20 of those patients to discontinue bosentan treatment. "You have to monitor these patients for liver function abnormalities very closely," he said.

Oedema also occurred frequently, occurring in 31 of his patients, but treatment with spironolactone was able to treat the oedema. Only 2 patients had to discontinue therapy due to oedema, he reported.

"The treated population differed from that in clinical trials by being older, having more Scleroderma, more comorbidities, and lower average walk distances," he said.

In the 6-minute walk test, subjects improved in their physical activity by about 60 metres from a baseline of about 300 metres. "We observed that this improvement was retained for at least 5 years," Dr. Dwyer said. The improvement was similar in those patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension and in scleroderma pulmonary arterial hypertension.

"Bosentan was well tolerated and resulted in significant benefits over a 5-year period," he said. "These data represent what might be expected in a population including all morbidities."

The patients were followed from 2003 through 2008. The researchers achieved a 100% follow-up of these patients. Their mean age was 63 years, and 121 of the participants were women. All of the patients were in New York Heart Association class 3 or 4.

Funding for this study was provided by Actelion, CSL, and Bayer.

Source: Doctor's Guide
 
More articles :

» Scleroderma and the Kidney

John F Donohoe Principle DiscussantPublished: Kidney International (1992) 41, 462–477; doi:10.1038/ki.1992.65Source: http://www.nature.com/ki/journal/v41/n2/abs/ki199265a.html

» Preliminary Results Show Beneficial Effects of Imatinib in Scleroderma

Imatinib (Gleevec), a drug that has significantly improved survival in chronic myelogenous leukemia and gastrointestinal stromal tumor, is showing beneficial effects on skin and lung manifestations in patients with diffuse cutaneous scleroderma....

» Our First Year Anniversary

Celebrating an important anniversary is always a blessing. The Scleroderma Care Foundation was officially incorporated on 15th October 2008. Its mission to provide support and education for persons afflicted with within Trinidad and Tobago became a...

» New Study Will Explore Impact of Exercise on Pulmonary Hypertension

For sufferers of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PAH), maintaining healthy heart function isn't as simple as going for a jog every morning. Patients need to do all they can to slow damage to their heart, and exercise can improve potentially improve...

» Modulation of Fibrosis in Systemic Sclerosis by Nitric Oxide and Antioxidants

Systemic sclerosis is a multisystem, connective tissue disease of unknown aetiology characterized by vascular dysfunction, autoimmunity, and enhanced fibroblast activity resulting in fibrosis of the skin, heart, and lungs, and ultimately internal...

» Geneticists Hunt for Scleroderma Triggers

In all its forms, gives Dartmouth geneticist Michael Whitfield, his graduate students, and his postdoctoral researchers a sense of urgency in their search for the triggers of the chronic condition. In a study that the Journal of Investigative...