HLA Class II Haplotype and Autoantibody Associations in Children PDF Print E-mail
Monday, 10 May 2010 20:37
L. R. Wedderburn; N. J. McHugh; H. Chinoy; R. G. Cooper; F. Salway; W. E. R. Ollier; L. J. McCann; H. Varsani; J. Dunphy; J.
North; J. E. Davidson
Posted: 12/19/2007; Rheumatology. 2007;46(12):1786-1791. © 2007 Oxford University Press

Objectives: To investigate a large cohort of children with juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM), and those with JDM-scleroderma (JDM-SSc) overlap, using detailed serological analysis, HLA class II genotyping and clinical characterization.

Methods: Children (114) with JDM were recruited, and clinical data collected, through the JDM National Registry and Repository (UK and Ireland). Sera were assayed for ANA using standard immunofluorescence techniques and specific antibodies characterized using ELISA, immunodiffusion and radioimmunoprecipitation. Patients and controls (n = 537) were genotyped at the HLA-DRB1 and DQB1 loci, and then the DQA1 locus data was derived.

Results: Over 70% of the patients were ANA-positive. Clear differences in serological and genetic data were demonstrated between JDM and JDM-SSc overlap groups. Strong associations were seen for HLA-DRB1*03 (all cases vs controls, P corr = 0.02; JDM-SSc vs controls, P corr = 0.001) and HLA-DQA1*05 (all cases vs controls, P corr = 0.01; JDM-SSc vs controls, P corr = 0.005). The frequency of the HLA-DRB1*03-DQA1*05-DQB1*02 haplotype was significantly increased in the JDM-SSc (P = 0.003) and anti-PM-Scl antibody (P = 0.002) positive groups. All anti-U1-RNP antibody-positive patients had at least one copy of HLA-DRB1*04-DQA1*03-DQB1*03 haplotype. Associations were observed between serology and specific clinical features.

Conclusions: We present clinical data, HLA genotyping and serological profiling on a large cohort of JDM patients and a carefully characterized subset of patients with JDM-SSc overlap. The results confirm known HLA associations and extend the knowledge by stratification of data in serological and clinical subgroups. In the future, a combination of serological and genetic typing may allow for better prediction of clinical course and disease subtype in JDM.

Login to download your own copy of the full and original article from the link provided below.

 
More articles :

» Preterm Delivery a Risk in Systemic Sclerosis

Many women with systemic sclerosis can have successful pregnancies, but the rates of preterm birth, low birth weight, and intrauterine growth restriction are approximately twice as high in these women compared to the general population of pregnant...

» Rituximab for Scleroderma: Does Something Finally Work?

Kevin Deane, MDPosted: 03/10/2010Experience With Rituximab in Scleroderma: Results From a 1-Year, Proof-of-Principle StudyDaoussis D, Liossis SN, Tsamandas AC, et al. Rheumatology (Oxford). 2010;49:271-280BackgroundMultiple drugs have been tried in...

» Rare Diseases Day

Febuary 28th, 2010 was Rare Diseases Day, and it was marked with a variety of events and activities all over the world - as well as with plenty of citizen media and online participation. The goal was to raise awareness about so-called. These are...

» arGentis Continues To Expand

But arGentis grew its drug-development pipeline this month with the acquisition of the rights to a rheumatoid arthritis therapy from the - the terms of which, were not disclosed. The treatment was developed at the University of Tennessee Health...

» Autoimmune Diseases May Increase Cancer Risk

A new study reveals that patients with certain autoimmune diseases are more likely to develop cancer. The new information could help doctors diagnose cancer at a much earlier stage.Two years ago, 67- year- old Dorothy Adams noticed a thickening and...

» 7 Tips For Maintaining Healthier Skin In Scleroderma

Scleroderma is a rare, connective tissue disease in which the body’s normal tissue is replaced with thick, dense tissue, due to the overproduction of collagen. Although can affect other parts of the body including the kidneys, hearts, and...