7 Fruits and Veggies That Keep You Young PDF Print E-mail
Friday, 16 April 2010 22:18
If you want to defy age, start from the inside. These seven fruits and vegetables contain a variety of nutrients that smooth skin, sharpen your mind, beat disease, and more.

1. Romaine lettuce
Why you'll glow: Six leaves provide more than 100 percent of your DV of vitamin A, which revitalizes skin by increasing cell turnover. The mineral potassium in romaine "gives skin a refreshing boost of nutrients and oxygen by improving circulation," says Lisa Drayer, R.D., author of The Beauty Diet.

Health bonus: That same serving of romaine contains 45 percent of the DV of vitamin K, which a recent study shows activates a protein that supports vascular health—making a future with bulging leg veins less likely.

2. Blueberries
New research shows that the purple-hued fruit may help sharpen your thought processes. After National Institute on Aging and Tufts University researchers injected male rats with kainic acid to simulate the oxidative stress that occurs with aging, rats that had been fed a diet containing 2 percent blueberry extract did better navigating a maze than rats that didn't get the compound. In another study, the same researchers found that rats that ate blueberries showed increased cell growth in the hippocampus region of the brain. The researchers theorize that anthocyanin—the dark blue pigment found in blueberries—is responsible for these cognitive changes; it contains chemicals that may cross the blood-brain barrier and lodge in regions that govern learning and memory.

3. Broccoli
Pick any life-threatening disease—cancer, heart disease, you name it—and eating more broccoli and its cruciferous cousins may help you beat it, Johns Hopkins research suggests. Averaging just four weekly servings of veggies like broccoli, cabbage, and cauliflower slashed the risk of dying from any disease by 26 percent among 6,100 people studied for 28 years. For maximum disease-fighting benefits, whip out your old veggie steamer. It turns out that steaming broccoli lightly releases the maximum amount of sulforaphane.

4. Red bell peppers
Citrus fruits get all the credit for vitamin C, but red bell peppers are actually the best source. Vitamin C may be best known for skin and immunity benefits. Researchers in the United Kingdom looked at vitamin C intake in 4,025 women and found that those who ate more had less wrinkling and dryness. And although getting enough vitamin C won’t prevent you from catching a cold or flu, studies show that it could help you recover faster.

Vitamin C has other important credentials, too. Finnish researchers found that men with low levels were 2.4 times likelier to have a stroke, and Australian scientists recently discovered that the antioxidant reduces knee pain by protecting your knees against arthritis.

5. Figs
When you think of potassium-rich produce, figs probably don’t come to mind, but you may be surprised to learn that six fresh figs have 891 mg of the blood pressure–lowering mineral, nearly 20 percent of your daily need—and about double what you’d find in one large banana. In a recent five-year study from the Netherlands, high-potassium diets were linked with lower rates of death from all causes in healthy adults age 55 and older. Figs are one of the best fruit sources of calcium, with nearly as much per serving (six figs) as a half cup of fat-free milk.

6. Lychee
A French study published in the Journal of Nutrition found that lychee has the second-highest level of heart-healthy polyphenols of all fruits tested—nearly 15 percent more than the amount found in grapes (cited by many as polyphenol powerhouses). The compounds may also play an important role in the prevention of degenerative diseases such as cancer. Serve by peeling or breaking the outer covering just below the stem; use a knife to remove the black pit. Add to stir-fries or skewer onto chicken kebabs to add a sweet, grapelike flavor.

7. Apples
One of the healthiest fruits you should be eating is one you probably already are: the apple. The Iowa Women’s Health Study, which has been investigating the health habits of 34,000 women for nearly 20 years, named apples as one of only three foods (along with pears and red wine) that are most effective at reducing the risk of death from heart disease among postmenopausal women. Other massive studies have found the fruit to lower risk of lung cancer and type 2 diabetes—and even help women lose weight.

Source: Msn.com
 
More articles :

» Primary Biliary Cirrhosis Associated with Systemic Sclerosis: Diagnostic and Clinical Challenges

Cristina Rigamonti, Dimitrios P. Bogdanos, Maria G.Mytilinaiou, Daniel S. Smyk, Eirini I. Rigopoulou, and Andrew K. BurroughsReceived 3 June 2011; Accepted 7 September 2011Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a chronic cholestatic liver disease...

» Alternative Strategies for Maintaining A Balanced Lifestyle

Research shows that a holistic lifestyle is beneficial to those with autoimmune disease. But let’s be honest: it can be difficult for anyone to keep up a perfectly balanced lifestyle — let alone someone with an . It’s great to take steps to...

» 9 Essential Tips For A Health Kidney

Tip #1Drink 8-8 glasses of water in a gradual manner over the day. Gulping 8 glasses on a morning and thinking that you have flushed for the day is erroneous, as you would merely urinate more. So take a glassful at a time over the waking hours,...

» Rare Disease Research Teams Receive Over $17m In Funding

(CIHR) has formed 9 new research teams that will focus on rare diseases. Funding from the CIHR will total $15.4 million over five years, primarily through the Institute of Genetics and the Institute of Nutrition, Metabolism, and Diabetes, while...

» Dealing With Chronic Pain

Pain—it’s something we’ve all experienced. From our first skinned knee to the headaches, back pain and creaky joints as we age, pain is something we encounter many times. Most pain is acute and goes away quickly. But in some cases, when pain...

» Understanding The Female Bias For Autoimmune Diseases

The reasons why women are so much more commonly affected by autoimmune disease have largely remained a complex mystery. Now, however, researchers from the have identified a previously unknown type of B cell in aged female mice and in young...