9 Essential Tips For A Health Kidney PDF Print E-mail
Tuesday, 23 March 2010 20:48
Tip #1
Drink 8-8 glasses of water in a gradual manner over the day. Gulping 8 glasses on a morning and thinking that you have flushed for the day is erroneous, as you would merely urinate more. So take a glassful at a time over the waking hours, especially while having your meals.

Tip #2
Don't overuse dairy products and red meats. No more than one small serving per week is recommended. Red meats (beef, sheep, goat, duck) are broken down to uric acid which can precipitate in the kidneys as stone - So too can excessive calcium found in dairy products and overuse of supplements.

Tip #3
Maintain rigid control of diabetes and/or hypertension. Keep daily records of your blood sugar and blood pressure if you suffer from these conditions.

Tip #4
Have very regular, preventative check-ups with your family doctor.

Tip #5
Any signs of blood in the urine must be investigated promptly. So too for any pain in the waist or urinary difficulties of any sort. If you experience pain in the waist area, do not ignore it. It is often a sign of kidney stones.

Tip #6
Have a full annual medical examination as soon as you turn 45, and keep up the discipline of annual check-ups for life. After age 60 you should do this twice yearly.

Tip #7
Women who experience any kidney problems (swollen ankles, elevated blood pressure and the finding of protein in the urine) during a pregnancy, should seek the advice of an obstetrician concerning future pregnancies. Post-delivery check-ups should be done until your doctor assures you that your kidneys are back to normal function.

Tip #8
Avoid weightgain and do exercise daily

Tip #9
Eat healthily, which means lots of vegetables, fruit, grain, and water.
 
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