Amira Pharmaceuticals Announces Efficacy of LPA1 Antagonist in a Preclinical Model of Scleroderma PDF Print E-mail
Thursday, 11 February 2010 11:22
Amira Pharmaceuticals, Inc. announced today that their collaborators, Andrew Tager, M.D. and Flavia V. Castelino, M.D. of Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, will present a preclinical proof-of-concept study which demonstrates that the bioactive lipid lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), through its high affinity LPA1 receptor, is an important mediator of fibrogenesis in the bleomycin mouse model of scleroderma.  Data will be presented as part of a poster session for the 1st Systemic Sclerosis World Congress to be held in Florence, Italy, February 11 to 13, 2010.

"Our data shows that in mice deficient for the LPA1 receptor, there is dramatic protection from the bleomycin-induced skin fibrosis seen in normal mice," said Dr. Tager, a member of Amira's Scientific Advisory Board.  "In addition, similar protection from fibrosis was observed in normal mice treated with Amira's LPA1 receptor antagonist, AM095."

Peppi Prasit, Ph.D., Chief Scientific Officer, said, "AM095 is an orally available, potent and selective antagonist of the LPA1 receptor.  We are currently moving AM095 and AM152, another LPA1 antagonist, through GLP toxicology testing and expect to initiate human clinical studies in the second half of 2010."

Bob Baltera, Chief Executive Officer, added, "So far we have seen compelling data in numerous preclinical models of fibrosis.  We are excited by the possibility of eventually exploring efficacy in human disease settings, such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, scleroderma, kidney and liver fibrosis, and various metastatic cancers. There is a lot of work to be done, and we are up to the challenge."

Source: Amira Pharmaceuticals
 
More articles :

» 7 Tips For Balancing Rest and Activity

I wanted to help patients and my friends by sharing some helpful tips about Scleroderma, an autoimmune disease in which the body attacks itself by destroying its own cells and functions. The effects of are quite severe and can affect a patient’s...

» The Many Faces of Interleukin-6: The Role of IL-6 in Inflammation, Vasculopathy, and Fibrosis in Systemic Sclerosis

Theresa C. Barnes,Marina E. Anderson, and Robert J.MootsReceived 1 June 2011; Accepted 21 July 2011Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a connective tissue disease characterised by fibrosis, vasculopathy, and immunological abnormalities. Over recent years,...

» Types of Stem Cell Treatments for Scleroderma

is a slowly debilitating terminal illness that robs the skin, limbs and vital organs through the process of pain upon exposure to cold and the tightening, thickening and in-elasticity of the skin. Scleroderma deposits connective tissue in places...

» Methotrexate Effective In Juvenile Localized Scleroderma

is effective in when given with a short course of steroids, an Italian randomized study confirmed.Among children ages 6 to 17 receiving methotrexate, 67.4% completed the yearlong trial without flaring, compared with 29.2% of those given placebo...

» Prevention Of Vascular Damage In Scleroderma With Angiotensin-converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibition

Great strides have been made in identifying and managing the organ-based complications of  systemic sclerosis (SSc). There is no room for the nihilism towards treating this disease that used to be so prevalent. However, there is still...

» ArGentis Seeks More Funding After Obtaining Patent for ARG201 Therapy

ArGentis Pharmaceuticals LLC has received a patent for its scleroderma therapy while finalizing plans for a Phase IIb trial for the treatment known as ARG201.The patent comes nearly two years after it was developed by University of Tennessee Health...