Stress Management - Conclusion PDF Print E-mail
Saturday, 12 September 2009 19:01
Article Index
Stress Management
Understanding Stress
Responses To Stress
Symptoms & Signs Of Stress
Coping with Stress
Accepting what you can't Change
Conclusion
All Pages
Managing stress can help you have less pain and feel healthier. It can also help you cope with the extra demands made on you by your Scleroderma. By following these suggestions, you may be able to get stress to work for you instead of against you.

Learn to identify those situations you can do something about and those you can't. Work at reducing the cause of your stress by communicating better, and respecting your limits of energy and pain. Simplify your life, "look on the bright side," and develop and keep a sense of humor. Prepare for stressful events by getting extra rest.

Remember that you can't change others. Keep in mind that no one is perfect. Seek professional help for serious problems.

Practice relaxation methods to overcome the effects of stress that you can't avoid. Engage in hobbies and simple pleasures that give you joy.

Finally, remember that managing stress is your job. With stress under control, it'll be easier to keep your disease under control.

References:
Dr. R. Khaja (2009), "Stress Management", Scleroderma Care Foundation
Canadian Mental Health Association (2009), "Stress". Online at http://www.cmha.ca/bins/content_page.asp?cid=2-28
David B. Posen, MD (1995), "Stress Management for Patient and Physician"; Online at http://www.mentalhealth.com/mag1/p51-str.html
Christos Ballas, M.D. (2008), "Stress Management"; Online at http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/001942.htm
Jeannette Curtis (2007), "Stress Management"; Online at http://health.yahoo.com/stress-overview/stress-management/healthwise--rlxsk.html
University of Washington Department of Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine (2005), "Stress And Arthritis"; Online at http://www.orthop.washington.edu/uw/livingwith/tabID__3376/ItemID__100/PageID__154/Articles/Default.aspx



Khaja


 
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Comments  

 
0 #2 chandu 2012-04-11 02:22
EXERCISE
MUSIC THERAPY
MEDITATION
HUMOR OR LAUGHING
PROGRESSIVE MUSCLE RELAXATION
DEEP BREATHING
MASSAGE
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0 #1 chandui 2012-04-11 02:20
i dont no
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