Dr. Dinesh Khanna Named, "Doctor Of The Year" PDF Print E-mail
Saturday, 20 August 2011 09:53
The Scleroderma Foundation named Dinesh Khanna, M.D., M.Sc., its 2011 Doctor of the Year during this year's National Patient Education Conference held last month in San Francisco. The award recognizes a skilled physician or researcher for his or her involvement within the Foundation, and for helping provide guidance and support to the organization's patient population.

"Those who know Dr. Khanna as a physician and caretaker know that he is a caring and compassionate doctor who does not lose sight of the fact those patients always come first," said Scleroderma Foundation's CEO Robert J. Riggs. "He is a highly-regarded researcher who is well respected among his peers in the medical community, and his patients also know him as a compassionate physician who always puts their well-being first and foremost."

Dr. Khanna is the Marvin & Betty Danto Research Professor of Connective Tissue Research and Associate Professor of Internal Medicine in the Division of Rheumatology, and the newly-appointed director of the Scleroderma Program at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. He previously was the clinical director of the scleroderma clinic at the David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California at Los Angeles.

He has authored more than 120 peer-reviewed publications and book chapters including a defining paper on gastrointestinal issues in scleroderma. Dr. Khanna received his medical training at the University College of Medical Sciences in New Delhi, India. He completed his residency at Wright State University School of Medicine in Dayton, Ohio, and a fellowship in rheumatology and a Master of Science in Clinical Research at the University of California at Los Angeles School of Medicine.

The leadership of the Scleroderma Foundation is proud to honor Dr. Khanna for his dedication to individuals impacted by this disease. He has made powerful contributions to research aimed at unraveling the cause of scleroderma, and the search to find effective treatments to enhance the lives of people living with this complex autoimmune disease.

Source: PRNewswire (2011), "Scleroderma Foundation Names University of Michigan Physician and Researcher as "Doctor of the Year"". Full news release can be found here
 
More articles :

» Women and Autoimmunity

50:1, 9:1, 2:1 these are just some ratios of autoimmune disease disparities between women and men. The Society for Women’s Health Research (SWHR) hosted the Capitol Hill briefing, The War Within: Women and Autoimmunity, on Tuesday, October 11 to...

» Optical Coherence Tomography: The first Quantitative Imaging Biomarker for Scleroderma

Using the , manufactured in the UK by Michelson Diagnostics Ltd, scientists at the Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds have developed the first quantitative imaging biomarker for skin involvement in . Scleroderma...

» Rare Disease Research Teams Receive Over $17m In Funding

(CIHR) has formed 9 new research teams that will focus on rare diseases. Funding from the CIHR will total $15.4 million over five years, primarily through the Institute of Genetics and the Institute of Nutrition, Metabolism, and Diabetes, while...

» Study Suggests Systemic Sclerosis Is an Independent Risk Factor for Atherosclerosis

A new study by researchers in Hong Kong suggests that is an independent determinant for moderate to severe coronary calcification or . Conventional cardiovascular risk factors such as age and hypertension predispose patients with systemic sclerosis...

» Genetics of Scleroderma: Implications For Personalized Medicine

Significant advances have been made in understanding the genetic basis of systemic sclerosis (scleroderma) in recent years. Can these discoveries lead to individualized monitoring and treatment? Besides robustly replicated genetic susceptibility...

» Cancer Drug May Also Work for Scleroderma

A drug used to treat cancer may also be effective in diseases that cause scarring of the internal organs or skin, such as pulmonary fibrosis or Scleroderma.The drug, with the generic name bortezomib, stopped the production of fibrotic proteins in...