Dealing With Raynaud's PDF Print E-mail
Friday, 22 January 2010 19:09
taken from  http://www.skincosmos.com/img/raynauds_cold_hands.jpg via creative  commonsRaynaud’s Disease, also known as Raynaud’s Phenomenon or Raynaud’s Syndrome, is a condition that decreases blood flow to body areas such as the hands or feet when exposed to cold temperatures.

Avoid Cold Exposure Inside and Outside:
Cold air (less than 60 degrees) may cause Raynaud’s attacks. Those with Raynaud’s Disease may lessen the number and severity of attacks by avoiding colder environments, both inside and outside. They may wish to also increase the temperature on the home thermostat or wear warmer clothing while indoors. For example, if reaching into the freezer causes an attack, wear mittens or gloves before opening the freezer door.

If needing to go outdoors during colder weather, you should wear warm, protective clothing, and consider layering.

Practical Tips for Keeping Hands and Feet Warm:
Although most with Raynaud’s experience symptoms in the hands and feet, other areas may also be affected.

Keeping the body warm can be simple and inexpensive:
  • Mittens tend to keep fingers warmer than gloves.
  • Heat packs may be placed in shoes, mittens, or pockets; however, seniors with poor circulation are at risk for burns when applying any type of heat to the skin and should check with a healthcare provider before using any type of heat source applied to the skin.
  • Turn on the heater and let the car warm up before driving in colder weather.

According to the National Institute of Health’s online article “How is Raynaud’s Treated?” healthy lifestyle changes may improve Raynaud’s symptoms and include:
  • Limit caffeine.
  • Limit alcohol use.
  • Do not smoke and avoid secondhand smoke.
  • Participate in regular physical activities, such as walking or group exercise classes.
  • Provide careful skin care for the hands and feet to prevent cracking and sores.
  • Wear shoes that fit properly and avoid going barefoot.
  • Avoid wearing items that might impair circulation, such as tight rings or bracelets.

Identify and Avoid Triggers:
People with secondary Raynaud’s have a condition, such as systemic lupus erythematous (SLE), that is often associated with the resulting cold body areas. Proper treatment and control of symptoms of the primary condition combined with the practical tips above may be very helpful in controlling the Raynaud’s attacks without the use of medications.

According to a Journal of Family Practice article by Tagliarino et al., entitled "What is the evaluation and treatment strategy for Raynaud's Phenomenon?", emotional stress may play a role in causing symptoms in Raynaud’s. Reducing stress through breathing exercises, yoga, progressive relaxation, and other stress reduction techniques may help lessen the number and severity of Raynaud’s attacks.

Some medications may cause cold hands or other body areas associated with Raynaud’s. Before experimenting with any medication changes, always check with the prescribing healthcare provider first.

Treat Raynaud’s Without Medication or Surgery:

Seniors tend to experience more side effects with medications and may be considered high risk for surgery, but those with Raynaud’s Phenomenon may find relief for symptoms by incorporating simple lifestyle changes and home remedies. Making healthy changes, such as smoking cessation, stress reduction, and regular exercise, may have the added benefit of improving overall health as well.

For those of you logged in, please feel free to download Tagliariano et al's Journal Of Family Practice article, below.

Source: Suite101

 
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Comments  

 
0 #2 adelwyn 2012-07-11 21:42
Is there any particular reason why you were denied access to medication?
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0 #1 your mum 2012-07-11 14:47
I have raynauds and i was diagnosed with it 2 months ago, its awful, i have to deal with immense pain, im a teenager and i was denied medication, please help :sad:
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